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Fraunhofer EMFT: Our Early and Ongoing Work in 3D Integration

3DInCities Knowledge Portal

5th May 2016

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Fraunhofer has been working on 3D integration for the past three decades, starting in1987 with a consortium of Siemens, AEG, Philips and the Munich institute IFT (now EMFT).

The European NMP project, MANpower is targeting a leadless pacemaker in a perpetually self-powered concept. Within the consortium of Tyndall, Sorin (now LivaNova), KU Leuven and others, Fraunhofer EMFT and 3D Plus are in charge of the 3D system integration for the electronic sub-component, consisting of ICs, MEMS and passives, interconnected and assembled with the energy harvesting system in a highly miniaturized implantable capsule.

Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting at the Heart of the Matter

22nd March 2016

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The desire to avoid open-heart surgery just to replace a battery is high on the wish list of medical specialists. Pacemaker batteries last around seven years, on average, and sometimes up to ten years. Elderly people generally have enough health issues to contend with, without having to undergo surgery simply to change a battery in their pacemaker. Any surgical procedure raises the risk of infection, severe bleeding or other complications. Younger patients requiring a pacemaker to correct a heart arrythmia, for example, face the prospect of undergoing frequent operations during their lifetime.

Thus, the autonomously powered pacemaker has long been the target of medical device developers. Converting vibrations from heartbeats into energy to power the pacemaker is the favorite approach, and the subject of many research projects from around the world.

Read More at Digikey..

Powering Pacemakers With Heartbeats

MedDeviceOnline.com

22nd March 2016

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Is the human heart strong enough to power a medical device?

That’s the concept behind research at Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork in Ireland. Researchers were awarded €6.1 million in funding from the European Union to explore whether energy extracted from a beating heart can be used to power a pacemaker.

Read more on MedDeviceOnline..

A Breakthrough Pacemaker Powered by the Heart

18th January 2016

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At the 2015 Innovation Showcase in the Convention Centre Dublin, Tyndall National Institute CEO Dr Kieran Drain introduced Silicon Republic to a pacemaker that can be powered by the heart itself.

Harnessing vibrational energy can mean heartbeat-powered pacemakers

horizon-magazine.eu/article/harnessing-vibrational-energy-can-mean-heartbeat-powered-pacemakers_en.html

21st January 2015

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The noise of a whirring washing machine or a house-rumbling lorry may seem like little more than a nuisance, but scientists are developing sophisticated devices to turn such everyday vibrations into a new energy source.

Just as solar panels provide a free supply of low-carbon renewable energy from the sun, harvesting vibrations from the environment can be an ecologically and financially friendly way to power sensors in remote areas or charge gadgets wirelessly.

New engineering techniques are helping scientists to gather power from even the smallest tremors, as tiny as the beating of a human heart.

‘Vibrations from the body in movement, from muscles or organs such as the heart or the lungs, share a common feature: a higher energy density in the low frequencies, well below 30 Hertz,’ said Dr Renzo Dal Molin, Director of Advanced Research for French pacemaker manufacturer Sorin Cardiac Rhythmic Management.

Those are deep tones. Human hearing bottoms out at around 20 Hertz.

Dr Dal Molin is part of an EU team working to create a pacemaker that can store such energy to shock the heart back into action if it stops beating, rather than using conventional batteries. The device would be the first medical implant capable of being powered by the body's own vibrations.

3D heterogeneous system integration

www.chipscalereview.com/tech1411.html

21st January 2015

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Typical sensor/IC integration schemes based on 3D-SoC technology with a) back-to-face IC stack, and b) face-to-face IC stack by TSV-SLID technology. Source: Fraunhofer EMFT.

By Manpower Project partners Peter Ramm [Fraunhofer Modular Solid State Technologies EMFT], Peter Schneider [Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits, Design Automation Division IIS-EAS], and Renzo Dal Molin [SORIN Group]

There are certainly different understandings in the microelectronics community with respect to the definition of 3D heterogeneous integration. A very general definition is as follows: 3D integration of different devices such as a CMOS processor and a memory, for example. According to a more limiting specification, there would be, as well, the integration of different substrate materials as a necessary condition (e.g., GaAs/silicon). This article will provide a reasonable definition of heterogeneity in between: 3D integration of components with significantly different device technologies such as CMOS and MEMS.

The next-generation pacemakers will deal with heterogeneous integration of energy harvesters and other passive components as super-capacitors. Corresponding low-temperature 3D integration processes have to be implemented in order to fulfill the challenging process temperature specifications for such components. For developing suitable technology solutions, i.e., for integration of durable energy harvesters to heterogeneous systems, SORIN, 3D PLUS, and Fraunhofer EMFT are continuing their cooperation through the Manpower Project.

Developing Heart-Powered Pacemakers

Medical Design Technology Magazine

10th December 2013

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Members of the European MANPower project team

A European consortium led by the Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork has secured EU funding for a €6.1 million project to engage in research into new materials and devices that will facilitate extraction and storage of energy from a beating heart to power a pacemaker.

The project, known as ‘MANpower’, will target the development of perpetually self-powered, electronic systems that can be implanted into the human body, thus removing the requirement for a battery replacement.

European researchers secure €6.1 million to fund project to develop heart powered pacemakers

Tyndall.ie

5th December 2013

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(l to r): Philip Cheasty, Enterprise Ireland; Cian O'Murchu, Tyndall; Colm O'Riordan, Communicraft; Alan Mathewson, Tyndall; John Barrett, CIT

A European consortium led by the Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork has secured EU funding for a €6.1 million project to engage in research into new materials and devices that will facilitate extraction and storage of energy from a beating heart to power a pacemaker.

The project, known as 'MANpower', will target the development of perpetually self-powered, electronic systems that can be implanted into the human body, thus removing the requirement for a battery replacement.

The collaborative project is coordinated by the Tyndall National Institute, and brings together a number of European partners including Fraunhofer - EMFT, Cork Institute of Technology (CIT), Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, IEF at Universite Paris-Sud, 3D Plus, Sorin and Communicraft Limited.

Tyndall scientists reveal self-powered pacemakers

www.irishexaminer.com

18th September 2013

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Dr.Nathan Jackson and Dr.Alan Mathewson

Smaller pacemakers could be available in the next few years thanks to revolutionary research in Cork to replace batteries with power generated by a patient’s own heartbeat.

Instead of batteries, which require surgery to replace them every few years, the technology being developed at the Tyndall National Institute would harness the energy of vibrations from the heart and turn it into an autonomous generator.

Scientists at the institute have developed a material more flexible than any other designed globally that can be used at the kind of nano-scale needed. It is planned to use this material to create a vibrating cantilever that would respond to the tiny motion of a beating heart.

Researchers net €1m in EU funding to pioneer MANpower energy-harvesting device

SiliconRepublic

18th September 2013

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Dr Nathan Jackson, principal investigator and member of the MANpower project at Tyndall National Institute, which has secured €1m in EU

A research project into futuristic implantable devices that could convert human heart vibrations into electrical energy, and potentially store it, has been awarded €1m in funding from the European Union (EU). The project is known as MANpower and it is all about pioneering the future of energy harvesting and storage using a fusion of nanotechnology, ICT, health-tech and industry expertise.

A team of nanotechnologists, ICT experts and scientists at Tyndall National Institute in Cork, Ireland, have been working with the Irish division of Analog Devices, to pioneer the device.

The EU funding news was revealed earlier today during a seminar on 'Emerging Devices and Technologies', which is part of a series of Industry Days being hosted this week in Cork by Tyndall.

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